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Self-care strategies to facilitate sleep in patients with heart disease—A qualitative study

Authors

  • Anna Johansson RN MNSc,

    1. Doctoral Student, Department of Cardiology, Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde Hospital, Skövde and Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
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  • Johan Karlsson RN BNSc,

    1. Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
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  • Karin Brödje RN BNSc,

    1. University Hospital, Linköping and Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
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  • Ulla Edell-Gustafsson CCRN PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Professor, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
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Ulla Edell-Gustafsson, Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden. E-mail: ulla.edell-gustafsson@liu.se

Abstract

Johansson A, Karlsson J, Brödje K, Edell-Gustafsson U. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2012; 18: 44–51

Self-care strategies to facilitate sleep in patients with heart disease—A qualitative study

This study aimed at exploring and describing the self-care management strategies used by patients with coronary artery disease to facilitate sleep. Qualitative interviews in a dialogue manner, in a phenomenographic reference frame analyzed according to manifest and latent principles of qualitative content analysis, were performed. A purposeful sampling technique was used including 11 patients with coronary heart disease in a Heart Medical Unit in a general hospital setting. Two main themes were identified: ‘sleep-rhythm’ and ‘sleep-hygiene’ including four descriptive categories. The categories reveal five basic responses including emotions, cognition, physical symptoms (reactions), behaviours and/or the sleep environment, which were related to perceived or actual presence of sleep-wake problems and health that were the underlying reason for the self-care management strategies. Basically, intervention studies that address these five responses for choice of non-pharmacological methods based on cognitive behavioural therapy provided by nurses are needed.

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