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Distracting children during blood draw: Looking through distraction cards is effective in pain relief of children during blood draw

Authors

  • Sevil Inal PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Assistant Professor, Health Science Faculty, Midwifery Department, Istanbul University, Bakirkoy, Istanbul, Turkey
      Sevil Inal, Health Science Faculty, Istanbul University, 34740 Bakirkoy, Istanbul, Turkey. Email: inalsevil@yahoo.com
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  • Meral Kelleci PhD

    1. Associate Professor, Nursing Department, Health Science Faculty, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum Volume 18, Issue 5, 518, Article first published online: 25 September 2012

  • Disclosures: This study was done at the Pediatric Clinic of Cerrahpaşa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University.

Sevil Inal, Health Science Faculty, Istanbul University, 34740 Bakirkoy, Istanbul, Turkey. Email: inalsevil@yahoo.com

Abstract

Inal S, Kelleci M. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2012; 18: 210–219

Distracting children during blood draw: Looking through distraction cards is effective in pain relief of children during blood draw

This study aims to investigate the effects of distraction method by way of looking through distraction cards/Flippits® to reduce procedural pain and anxiety during blood draw. In this method we distract attention of the children with distraction cards/Flippits®. Flippits® consist of various eye-catching pictures and shapes. Then we asked the children questions about the cards during the blood draw procedure that he or she can only answer if he or she examines the cards carefully.

This study is a prospective, randomized controlled trial. The sample consisted of 123 children of ages between 6 and 12. We randomly assigned subjects into two groups. Group 1 received no intervention, whereas Group 2 received distraction in the form of looking through distraction cards/Flippits®. Pre-procedural and procedural anxiety was assessed using the anxiety scale from the Children's Anxiety and Pain Scales by parents' and observer's report. Procedural pain was assessed using Faces Pain Scale-Revised by children, parent and observer reports.

Results show that pre-procedural anxiety did not differ significantly. However, the experimental group had significantly lower pain levels than the control group during the blood draw procedure. Also experimental group had significantly lower anxiety levels than the control group.

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