A person-centred lifestyle change intervention model: Working with older people experiencing chronic illness

Authors

  • Nel Glass PhD MHPEd BA Dip NeuroNsg RN FRCNA FCN,

    Research Professor of Nursing, Corresponding author
    • School of Nursing and Midwifery, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
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  • Cheryle Moss PhD MSc Grad Dip Ed Admin BAppSc RN CertCCU FRCNA,

    Associate Professor Nursing
    1. Research and Practice Development, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
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  • K Robyn Ogle PhD MH, BAppScNsg CertCritCare RN RM

    Research Fellow
    1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
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  • Author contributions and agreement

    All authors have contributed significantly to the manuscript and are in agreement with the content.

    Professor Nel Glass 50%

    Associate Professor Cheryle Moss 30%

    Dr K Robyn Ogle 20%

  • Conflict of interest statement

    On behalf of all the authors, Professor Nel Glass, Associate Professor Cheryle Moss and Dr K Robyn Ogle, the work entitled ‘A person-centred lifestyle change intervention model: Working with older people experiencing chronic illness’ has not been published and is not being considered for publication elsewhere.

    There is no conflict of interest.

Correspondence: Nel Glass, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Australian Catholic University, Locked Bag 4115, Fitzroy, MDC, VIC 3065, Australia. Email: nel.glass@acu.edu.au

Abstract

A person-centred health promotion model of care to improve self-care and lifestyle changes for older people with chronic illnesses is conceptualized in this paper. The model supports effective interpersonal communication with nurses and health-care consumers and is developed to concept stage. Older people with chronic illnesses who experience stress, anxiety or social isolation are more likely to be admitted and re-admitted to acute hospitals. Interventions to decrease the risk factors are frequently unsuccessful in this patient group. Programmes, led by nurses, aimed at reducing stress, anxiety and social isolation while supporting older people postdischarge from hospital might be successful. The model integrates research from synthesized case studies and a critical literature review. The practices of interrelating four key elements—‘construct’, ‘context’, ‘process’ and ‘outcome'—are proposed for nurses to assist patients advancing self-care and lifestyle change. The model is designed for implementation in outpatient, clinic or community settings.

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