Self-reported body weight and height on admission to hospital: A reliable method in multi-professional evidence-based nutritional care?

Authors

  • Bart Geurden RN MSc,

    Nurse, Teacher, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health Care, Karel de Grote University College, Antwerp, Belgium
    • Centre for Research and Innovation in Care (CRIC), University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
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  • Erik Franck MPsych PhD,

    Teacher, Nurse
    1. Centre for Research and Innovation in Care (CRIC), University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
    2. Department of Health Care, Karel de Grote University College, Antwerp, Belgium
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  • Luc Van Looy MD,

    Medical Doctor
    1. GZA Hospitals, Wilrijk, Belgium
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  • Joost Weyler MD PhD,

    Professor
    1. Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
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  • Dirk Ysebaert MD PhD

    Professor
    1. Department of Abdominal Surgery & Transplantation, Antwerp University Hospital, University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium
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Correspondence: Bart J.G. Geurden, Centre for Research and Innovation in Care (CRIC), University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium. Email: bart.geurden@ua.ac.be; Department of Health Care, Karel de Grote University College, Van Schoonbekestraat 143, 2018 Antwerp, Belgium. Email: bart.geurden@kdg.be

Abstract

Screening patients' nutritional status on admission to hospital is recommended by evidence-based guidelines on malnutrition. In practice, self-reported values for body weight and height are often used by nurses and dieticians. This study assessed the accuracy of self-reported body weight and height and whether these self-reported values might be influenced by the nature of the health-care worker involved. Patients (n = 611) on admission reported their body weight and height to a nurse and a dietician. Reported values were analysed and compared with the measured values. Self-reported values for body weight and height on admission are not always accurate. Patients do report different values to different health-care workers. Self-reported values for body weight to nurses were more accurate as compared with dieticians. Self-reported values for body weight and height are subject to observer bias and should be used with caution in nutritional screening and multi-professional nutritional care.

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