Chilli ingestion does not lead to macroscopic gastroduodenal mucosal damage in healthy subjects

Authors

  • J. Y. KANG,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, and 2Department of Medicine III, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
    Search for more papers by this author
  • I. YAP,

    1. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, and 2Department of Medicine III, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
    Search for more papers by this author
  • R. GUAN,

    1. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, and 2Department of Medicine III, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
    Search for more papers by this author
  • T. C. LIM

    1. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, and 2Department of Medicine III, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
    Search for more papers by this author

  • *Part of this study was presented at the autumn scientific meeting of the British Society of Gastroenterology, September 1986.

Correspondence: Assoc. Prof. J. Y. Kang, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, Singapore 0511.

ABSTRACT

Thirty-eight healthy subjects who had normal index endoscopies were re-endoscoped following ingestion of 20 g of chilli powder with 400 ml of water, 600 mg aspirin BP with 400 ml of water or 400 ml of water only. There were good correlations between endoscopic scores given by two endoscopists who independently recorded their findings, as well as with scores given by a third observer viewing photographs taken at endoscopy. There were statistically significant differences between the aspirin group and the other two groups but not between the chilli and the control groups. Chilli ingestion, therefore, does not lead to macroscopic gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

Ancillary