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Group A streptococcal infections in children

Authors

  • Andrew C Steer,

    1. Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria and
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  • Margaret H Danchin,

    1. Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria and
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  • Jonathan R Carapetis

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria and
    2. Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
      Professor Jonathan Carapetis, Menzies School of Health Research, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia. Fax: +61 88922 8999; email: jonathan.carapetis@menzies.edu.au
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Professor Jonathan Carapetis, Menzies School of Health Research, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia. Fax: +61 88922 8999; email: jonathan.carapetis@menzies.edu.au

Abstract

Abstract:  The group A streptococcus causes the widest range of disease in humans of all bacterial pathogens. Group A streptococcal diseases are more common in children than adults with diseases ranging from pharyngitis and impetigo to invasive infections and the post-streptococcal sequelae – acute rheumatic fever and acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. The global burden of severe group A streptococcal disease is concentrated largely in developing countries and Indigenous populations such as Aboriginal Australians. Control of group A streptococcal disease is poor in these settings and the need for a vaccine has been argued. With an ever-increasing understanding of the group A streptococcus at a molecular level, new and sophisticated vaccines are currently in human trials and the next decade holds exciting prospects for curbing group A streptococcal diseases.

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