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Human papillomavirus in adolescents: Lessons learned from decades of evaluation

Authors

  • Yasmin L Jayasinghe,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital
    2. Departments of Pediatrics
    3. Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
    4. Department of Gynaecology, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
      Dr Yasmin Jayasinghe, Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital, Locked Bag 300, Parkville, Vic. 3052, Australia. Fax: +613 9347 8235; email: yasmin.jayasinghe@thewomens.org.au
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  • Elya E Moore,

    1. Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital
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  • Sepehr N Tabrizi,

    1. Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital
    2. Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
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  • Sonia R Grover,

    1. Departments of Pediatrics
    2. Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
    3. Department of Gynaecology, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Suzanne M Garland

    1. Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital
    2. Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
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Dr Yasmin Jayasinghe, Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital, Locked Bag 300, Parkville, Vic. 3052, Australia. Fax: +613 9347 8235; email: yasmin.jayasinghe@thewomens.org.au

Abstract

Knowledge regarding the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and its clinical sequelae in adolescents has increased significantly over the last decade; as a result, there have been world-wide recommendations for less aggressive Pap screening and management of cervical dysplasias in young women. It is important that adolescent health providers understand these issues, as knowledge of HPV and its sequelae in the Australian community is limited, despite the introduction of a national immunisation programme. Parents and young women have expressed a desire for further information to make informed choices. This paper reviews the natural history of HPV infection in adolescents and the evidence behind new conservative guidelines for cervical screening, plus prophylactic vaccination in young women.

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