Intermittent fever, splenomegaly and eosinophilia in a recently resettled African refugee

Authors

  • Muhammad Mohd Abd Rahman,

    1. Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit
    2. Department of Paediatrics, Monash University, Melbourne
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  • Penelope Bryant,

    1. Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit
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  • Des Guppy,

    1. Department of General Paediatrics, Monash Childrens
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  • Jim Buttery,

    1. Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit
    2. Department of Paediatrics, Monash University, Melbourne
    3. Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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  • David Burgner

    Corresponding author
    1. Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit
    2. Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
      Dr David Burgner, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Vic. 3052, Australia. Fax: +6139936 6528; email: david.burgner@mcri.edu.au
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Dr David Burgner, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Vic. 3052, Australia. Fax: +6139936 6528; email: david.burgner@mcri.edu.au

Abstract:

We discuss a recently resettled African refugee child with acute schistosomiasis, who presented with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and marked eosinophilia. We outline the differential diagnoses of eosinophilia in the recently resettled refugee and returned traveller and outline the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of schistosomal infection, including controversies in management of acute schistosomiasis.

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