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Keywords:

  • brain;
  • central nervous system;
  • embryonal tumor;
  • p53;
  • pnet

Embryonal tumors are a group of malignant neoplasms that most commonly affect the pediatric population. Embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes is a recently recognized rare tumor. It is composed of neurocytes and undifferentiated neuroepithelial cells arranged in clusters, cords and several types of rosettes in a prominent neuropil-rich background. We describe a new case of this tumor. The patient, a 24-month-old female infant, was referred to the Meyer Children's Hospital with a history of right brachio-crural deficit associated with occasional episodes of headache and vomiting. Computed tomography scan and MRI revealed a large bihemispheric mass. The patient underwent two consecutive surgeries. The resultant surgical resection of the tumor was macroscopically complete. The postoperative period was uneventful. On light microscopy the tumor showed a composite morphology: embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes (specimen from the first surgery); medulloepithelioma with mesenchymal and epithelial areas (specimen from the second surgery). The immunohistochemistry evidenced the heterogeneous (neuronal, mesenchymal and epithelial) immunoprofile of tumoral cells. By real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the PTEN gene expression in the tumor was lower than in the five non-neoplastic brain tissues used as control. Mutation analysis did not show any variation in INI-1 and PTEN sequence while P53 analysis showed the presence of homozygote P72R variation. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis showed polysomy of chromosome 2 while amplification of N-MYC was not detected. Owing to the rarity of embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes, each new case should be recorded to produce a better clinical, pathological and molecular characterization of this lesion.