Dexamethasone suppression test in borderline personality disorder: Impact of PTSD symptoms

Authors

  • KATJA WINGENFELD phd,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Bethel, Ev. Hospital Bielefeld, Bielefeld,
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  • ANDREAS HILL md ,

    1. University of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck,
    2. Institute of Sexology and Forensic Psychiatry, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg,
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  • BETTINA ADAM md ,

    1. University of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck,
    2. August Bier Hospital, Bad Malente-Gremsmühlen, and
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  • MARTIN DRIESSEN md , phd

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Bethel, Ev. Hospital Bielefeld, Bielefeld,
    2. University of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck,
    3. University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany
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Katja Wingenfeld, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Bethel, Ev. Hospital Bielefeld, Remterweg 69-71, D-33617 Bielefeld, Germany. Email: katja.wingenfeld@evkb.de

Abstract

Abstract  The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms on hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis feedback regulation in 18 female patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and 21 healthy controls. Reduced feedback sensitivity was found in BPD patients with a low number of PTSD symptoms, while findings in the BPD group with a high number of PTSD symptoms did not differ from those in controls. The results suggest a hypo-suppression in the dexamethasone suppression test in BPD with few PTSD symptoms.

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