Widespread cognitive impairment in psychogenic anterograde amnesia

Authors

  • SANJAY KUMAR phd,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Clinical Psychology and
    2. Behavioral Brain Sciences Center, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
      Sanjay Kumar, PhD, Behavioral Brain Sciences Center, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. Email: s.kumar.1@bham.ac.uk
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  • SHOBINI L. RAO phd,

    1. Departments of Clinical Psychology and
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  • BIJU SUNNY md ,

    1. Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore, India and
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  • BANGALORE N. GANGADHAR md

    1. Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore, India and
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Sanjay Kumar, PhD, Behavioral Brain Sciences Center, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. Email: s.kumar.1@bham.ac.uk

Abstract

Abstract  A 34-year-old man without a past history of any psychiatric or neurological disorder developed severe anterograde amnesia following a psychological trauma. Initial assessment of neuropsychological functions 3 months after the psychological trauma indicated severe memory deficits for acquiring new information in both verbal and visual modalities with widespread cognitive deficits in attention, executive functions, and intellectual ability. Importantly, working and remote memory were intact. The case illustrates that psychogenic anterograde amnesia might be associated with a wider range of cognitive deficits. Possible neurobiological explanations are discussed to explain large cognitive impairments associated with anterograde psychogenic amnesia.

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