Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid substance P in post-stroke patients with depression

Authors

  • Ling Li md, phd,

    1. Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Xiaoya Gao md ,

    1. Zhujing Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jia Zhao md ,

    1. Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Xunming Ji md, phd,

    1. Cerebrovascular Diseases Research Institute, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Ministry of Education, Beijing,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Huan Wei md ,

    1. Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yumin Luo md, phd

    Corresponding author
    1. Cerebrovascular Diseases Research Institute, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Ministry of Education, Beijing,
    • *Dr. Yumin Luo, md, phd, Cerebrovascular Diseases Research Institute, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Ministry of Education, 45 Changchun St, Beijing, 100053, China. Email: yumin111@ccmu.edu.cn

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Aims:  To investigate the correlation between the incidence of post-stroke depression (PSD) and the levels of substance P (SP) in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

Methods:  Ninety-one stroke patients were divided into PSD (n = 46) and post-stroke (without depression) groups (n = 45). PSD must have occurred 2–4 weeks after the onset of the stroke and was determined by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD). In addition, the subjects were divided into anterior (n = 67) and posterior circulation stroke groups (n = 24) based on the location of the focus as determined by computed tomography. All recruited patients were graded by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS).

Results:  The results included the following findings: (i) the level of plasma SP in the PSD group (58.47 ± 14.39) was higher than that of the PS group (36.98 ± 9.49; P = 0.000), while the level of CSF SP in the PSD group (72.13 ± 13.06) was higher than that of the post-stroke group (37.30 ± 12.57; P = 0.03); (ii) the level of plasma SP was positively correlated with the HAMD and NIHSS score; (iii) the level of plasma SP (38.45 ± 12.23), the HAMD score (9.08 ± 8.72), and the NIHSS score (3.25 ± 1.90) of the anterior stroke group (51.21 ± 16.27, 17.46 ± 15.96, and 6.91 ± 3.30, respectively) were higher than those of the posterior stroke group (38.45 ± 12.23, 9.08 ± 8.7, and 3.25 ± 1.90, respectively; P = 0.017, P = 0.001, and P = 0.000, respectively).

Conclusions:  SP in the plasma and CSF of patients exhibited a close correlation with neural damage and the incidence of PSD. This study also suggested that anterior hemispheric strokes may play a significant role in development of PSD.

Ancillary