Attenuated prefrontal activation during a verbal fluency task in remitted major depression

Authors

  • Go Okada md, phd,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Programs for Biomedical Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima,
    • *Go Okada, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Programs for Biomedical Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551, Japan. Email: goookada@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

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  • Yasumasa Okamoto md, phd,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Programs for Biomedical Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima,
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  • Hidehisa Yamashita md, phd,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Programs for Biomedical Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima,
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  • Kazutaka Ueda phd,

    1. Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, Tokyo and
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  • Hiroshi Takami md, phd,

    1. Kamo Psychiatry Medical Center, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Shigeto Yamawaki md, phd

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Programs for Biomedical Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima,
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Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a functional abnormality in the left prefrontal cortex observed in patients with major depression performing a verbal fluency task is present after remission of depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to study changes in cerebral blood oxygenation in eight remitted patients with major depression and 10 healthy control subjects during a verbal fluency task. Compared to the control subjects, the patients had a reduced response in the left prefrontal cortex (middle frontal gyrus, Brodmann area 10). These findings suggest the presence of dysfunction in the left prefrontal cortex during remission in major depression.

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