Effect of temperaments on quality of life and social adaptation in depressive patients with mood disorder

Authors


  • Yoshifumi Takai is a medical student who studied this topic in his research term during 4th year.

Takeshi Terao, MD, PhD, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Idaigaoka 1-1, Hasama-machi, Yufu-city, Oita 879-5593, Japan. Email: terao@med.oita-u.ac.jp

Abstract

Aims:  The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of temperament on quality of life and social adaptation in depressive patients with mood disorder.

Methods:  Forty-six consecutive depressive outpatients were investigated by using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-Autoquestionnaire version, the Munich Personality Test, the World Health Organization Quality of Life 26 (WHO QOL 26), and the Social Adaptation Self-evaluation Scale (SASS). The unpaired t-test, Pearson's r and multiple regression analysis were used to assess three variables (age, the number of temperaments and/or personality types, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores) as independent variables with the scores of WHO QOL 26 and SASS as the dependent variables.

Results:  The number of temperaments and/or personalities and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly and negatively associated with WHO QOL 26 scores while only the number of temperaments and/or personalities was significantly and negatively associated with SASS scores.

Conclusions:  The findings suggest that the combination of temperaments and/or personality types assessed with the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-Autoquestionnaire version and the Munich Personality Test may worsen both quality of life and social adaptation and that some temperaments and/or personality types in combination may be subclinical manifestations of mood disorders.

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