Influence of self-efficacy on the interpersonal behavior of schizophrenia patients undergoing rehabilitation in psychiatric day-care services

Authors

  • Takafumi Morimoto OTR, MS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Sciences
    2. Program of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Sapporo Medical University
    3. Department of Day Care, Hayashishita Hospital, Sapporo, Japan
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  • Kiyoji Matsuyama MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Sciences
    2. Program of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Sapporo Medical University
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  • Satoe Ichihara-Takeda OTR, PhD,

    1. Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Sciences
    2. Program of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Sapporo Medical University
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  • Ryuta Murakami OTR,

    1. Department of Day Care, Hayashishita Hospital, Sapporo, Japan
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  • Nozomu Ikeda OTR, PhD

    1. Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Sciences
    2. Program of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Sapporo Medical University
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Takafumi Morimoto, OTR, MS, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Sapporo Medical University, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556, Japan. Email: takamori@sapmed.ac.jp

Abstract

Aim:  The present study examined whether the self-efficacy of interpersonal behavior influenced the interpersonal behavior of schizophrenia patients using psychiatric day-care services.

Methods:  Thirty-nine patients with schizophrenia were examined with the Interpersonal Relations subscale of the Life Assessment Scale for Mentally Ill, the Self-efficacy Scale of Interpersonal Behavior, the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia–Japanese version, and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale.

Results:  The Life Assessment Scale for Mentally Ill score was significantly correlated with the self-efficacy of interpersonal behavior, and was also significantly correlated with neurocognitive functions and negative symptoms. However, the Self-efficacy Scale of Interpersonal Behavior score was not correlated with neurocognitive functions and negative symptoms. To examine the causal correlations between the above social, psychological and clinical factors, multiple regression analysis was performed with the self-efficacy of interpersonal behavior, neurocognitive functions, and negative symptoms as the independent variables and interpersonal behavior as the dependent variable. The self-efficacy of interpersonal behavior was found to contribute to interpersonal behavior as well as neurocognitive functions.

Conclusion:  The self-efficacy of interpersonal behavior contributed to the interpersonal behavior as well as the neurocognitive functions in the case of schizophrenia patients in the community. This suggested that interventions targeting the self-efficacy of interpersonal behavior, as well as those targeting neurocognitive functions, were important to improve the interpersonal behavior of schizophrenia patients undergoing psychiatric rehabilitation in the community.

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