Factor structure in the Camberwell Assessment of Need–Patient Version: The correlations with dimensions of illness, personality and quality of life of schizophrenia patients

Authors

  • Michael S. Ritsner MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, and Sha'ar Menashe Mental Health Center, Hadera, Israel
      Michael S. Ritsner, MD, PhD, Director, Acute Department, Sha'ar Menashe Mental Health Center, Mobile Post Hefer 38814, Hadera, Israel. Email: ritsner@sm.health.gov.il
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  • Alexander Lisker MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, and Sha'ar Menashe Mental Health Center, Hadera, Israel
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  • Marina Arbitman MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, and Sha'ar Menashe Mental Health Center, Hadera, Israel
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  • Alexander Grinshpoon MD, MHA

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, and Sha'ar Menashe Mental Health Center, Hadera, Israel
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Michael S. Ritsner, MD, PhD, Director, Acute Department, Sha'ar Menashe Mental Health Center, Mobile Post Hefer 38814, Hadera, Israel. Email: ritsner@sm.health.gov.il

Abstract

Aim:  To investigate the factor structure underlying the Camberwell Assessment of Need–Patient Version (CANSAS-P) items in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

Method:  Factor, correlation and regression analyses were performed for dimensions of CANSAS-P, illness, personality and quality of life (QOL) related variables in 95 stabilized patients with chronic schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

Results:  Exploratory factor analysis revealed a four-factor model that explains 50.4% of the total variance of the 20 CANSAS-P items. The factors ‘Social disability’, ‘Information processing disability’, ‘Emotional processing disability’, and ‘Coping disability’ showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's α coefficient 0.67–0.77). The CANSAS-P subscale scores positively correlated with severity of symptoms, distress (r ranged from 0.34 to 0.45), while negatively associated with general functioning (r = −0.34), friend (r = −0.46) and family support (r = −0.41), satisfaction with medicine (r = −0.35), general activities (r = −0.40), and general QOL (r = −0.35) (all P < 0.001). Severity of illness, symptoms, emotional distress and emotion-oriented coping were positive predictors; friend support, QOL general activities, life satisfaction and satisfaction with medicine were negative predictors of the CANSAS-P subscale scores. The effect size (f2) for these predictors ranged from medium to quite large (f2 = 0.28–1.13), and they explain from 23% to 46% of the variability in CANSAS-P subscales.

Conclusions:  A four-factor structure mode, including social and cognitive functioning, emotion responsivity and coping with daily challenges, appears to fit CANSAS-P items. These subscales may contribute to research and improve treatment of psychiatric patients.

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