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Effect of temperature on the biology of Creontiades dilutus (Stål) (Heteroptera: Miridae)

Authors

  • Moazzem Khan,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Rural Science and Agriculture, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.
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    • Present address: Queensland Primary Industries and Fisheries, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, 203 Tor Street, PO Box 102, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia.

  • Peter Gregg,

    1. School of Rural Science and Agriculture, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.
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  • Robert Mensah

    1. New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, ACRI, Locked Bag 1000, Narrabri, NSW 2390, Australia.
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* moazzem.khan@deedi.qld.gov.au

Abstract

The egg and nymphal development, fecundity and survival of the green mirid, Creontiades dilutus were examined at a range of temperatures and a modified day-degree model fitted to the data. Day degree (DD) requirements for egg and nymphal development, and threshold temperatures were calculated from the fitted lines. Female fecundity and longevity, egg and nymphal development, and survival of C. dilutus were significantly influenced by temperature. Eggs and nymphs failed to complete development at temperatures below 17 and at 38°C. Females also failed to produce any eggs at 11 and 38°C. The optimum temperature range for female fecundity was found to be 26–32°C. The optimum temperature for the development of eggs was calculated from the model as 30.5°C and for nymphs as 31.5°C. The threshold temperature for development was 15.8°C for egg and 15.1°C for nymph; 69.4 and 156.7 DD were required for completing the egg and the nymphal development, respectively. At the optimum temperature, it was estimated that development from egg to adult took 15 days. Survival was highest at 26°C for eggs and at 30–32°C for nymphs.

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