Research to realisation: the challenging path for novel pest management products in Australia

Authors

  • Peter C Gregg,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cotton Catchment Communities CRC, Locked Bag 1001, Narrabri, NSW 2390, Australia.
    2. School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.
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  • Kerryn A Greive,

    1. Ego Pharmaceuticals, 21–31 Malcolm Road, Braeside, Vic. 3195, Australia.
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  • Alice P Del Socorro,

    1. Cotton Catchment Communities CRC, Locked Bag 1001, Narrabri, NSW 2390, Australia.
    2. School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.
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  • Anthony J Hawes

    1. Cotton Catchment Communities CRC, Locked Bag 1001, Narrabri, NSW 2390, Australia.
    2. Ag Biotech Australia Pty Ltd, PO Box 537, Richmond, NSW 2753, Australia.
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* pgregg@une.edu.au

Abstract

In this Overview, we explore the linkages between basic research and the commercial development of novel pest management products in Australia. Despite the large volume of research in fundamental and applied aspects of entomology, very few new pest management products are developed and commercialised in Australia. Reasons for this include demanding and expensive regulatory requirements which (as in many other countries) mean that commercial development is the province of large multinational agrochemical companies. We describe the Australian regulatory system and the opportunities and difficulties it can present, using examples from recently registered Australian products, Magnet® moth attractant and the MOOV® range of insect repellents. The science behind these products is described in a series of papers in this issue of Australian Journal of Entomology. We also explore some of the commercial imperatives in novel product development, and aspects of the interactions between researchers and commercial partners. Finally, we discuss potential advantages of Australia as a locale for commercial development of novel products.

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