Review of the biology and control of Creontiades dilutus (Stål) (Hemiptera: Miridae)

Authors

  • Stuart A McColl,

    Corresponding author
    1. CESAR Consultants, Suite 102, 55 Flemington Road, North Melbourne, Vic. 3051, Australia.
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  • Moazzem Khan,

    1. Agri-Science Queensland, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, 203 Tor Street, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia.
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  • Paul A Umina

    1. CESAR Consultants, Suite 102, 55 Flemington Road, North Melbourne, Vic. 3051, Australia.
    2. Department of Zoology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010, Australia.
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum Volume 50, Issue 3, 321, Article first published online: 22 August 2011

stuart@cesarconsultants.com.au

Abstract

Here we review the current knowledge of green mirids, Creontiades dilutus (Hemiptera: Miridae). Creontiades dilutus are highly polyphagous pests that are endemic to Australia. They are widely distributed across Australia and feed on a broad range of agricultural crops. Recently, C. dilutus has become an important focus of pest control in Australian cotton crops, most likely due to a decrease in insecticide use associated with the widespread uptake of transgenic cotton varieties. Prior to this, C. dilutus had been coincidentally controlled in cotton by applications of insecticides targeted at other pests such as Helicoverpa spp. Further, the pest status of C. dilutus in summer pulse crops has become more apparent due to the increased research dedicated to this area over the past decade. We review various aspects of the biology and ecology of C. dilutus, including their life cycle, feeding behaviour and host plants. We also examine current control methods and laboratory-rearing techniques, which will be important for the development of novel control strategies in cotton and other cropping environments. Possible future research directions are highlighted, such as dispersal capabilities and extent of genetic structure within C. dilutus populations, as these will have important implications for effective and sustainable control in the future.

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