Esterases and glutathione S-transferases contribute to pyrethroid resistance in western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis

Authors

  • Swaminathan Thalavaisundaram,

    1. Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Sydney, Australian Technology Park, Eveleigh, NSW 2015, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Meredith A Wilkes,

    1. Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Sydney, Australian Technology Park, Eveleigh, NSW 2015, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sarah Mansfield,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Sydney, Australian Technology Park, Eveleigh, NSW 2015, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Harley A Rose,

    1. Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Sydney, Australian Technology Park, Eveleigh, NSW 2015, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Grant A Herron

    1. NSW Department of Primary Industries, Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, PMB 4008, Narellan, NSW 2567, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author

sarah.mansfield@sydney.edu.au

Abstract

Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentali s (Pergande), has developed a high level of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in Australia. Biochemical examination of those pyrethroid-resistant populations shows esterase activity 2.0- to 6.5-fold higher in six of the seven resistant field populations compared with the susceptible population. This increase in esterase activity in the resistant populations was further supported by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and inhibition studies with the organophosphate insecticide profenofos. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed differences in the banding pattern and intensity of the esterase isozymes between the pyrethroid-resistant and susceptible F. occidentalis populations. Glutathione S-transferase activity was significantly higher (up to 1.7-fold) in five of the seven resistant field populations when compared with the susceptible populations. Esterases appear to be an important mechanism that contributes to pyrethroid resistance. Glutathione S-transferases may also play a role in pyrethroid resistance in Australian F. occidentalis populations.

Ancillary