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Topographic effects on fine-scale spatial genetic structure in Castanopsis chinensis Hance (Fagaceae)

Authors

  • JIAN HE,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization
    2. Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
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  • XIAOYI LI,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization
    2. Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
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  • DANDAN GAO,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization
    2. Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
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  • PENG ZHU,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization
    2. Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
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  • ZHENGFENG WANG,

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization
    2. Guangdong Key Laboratory of Digital Botanical Garden, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650
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  • ZHANGMING WANG,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization
    2. Guangdong Key Laboratory of Digital Botanical Garden, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650
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  • WANHUI YE,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization
    2. Guangdong Key Laboratory of Digital Botanical Garden, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650
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  • HONGLIN CAO

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization
    2. Guangdong Key Laboratory of Digital Botanical Garden, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650
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Zhengfeng Wang, Email: wzf@scbg.ac.cn

Abstract

Ecological study plots are usually treated as if they are flat. This does not hold for many situations such as mountains where topography is complex. In areas with complex topography individual relationships are not only determined by projection distance, but also by surface distance. To demonstrate this we compared projection and surface distances by analyzing spatial genetic autocorrelation for Castanopsis chinensis in two subplots (A and B) in the Dinghushan (DHS) national nature reserve in subtropical South China. We observed that the two types of distances generally result in similar fine-scale spatial genetic structure (SGS) patterning for the spatially less structured subplot B, but not for the highly structured subplot A. The present study shows clearly that accounting for plot architecture in plant species on topographically complex areas enables a more accurate picture of the underlying spatial genetic structure to emerge.

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