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Keywords:

  • epidemiology;
  • incidence;
  • Japan;
  • mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome;
  • nationwide surveys

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of the present study was to describe the results of nationwide epidemiologic surveys of Kawasaki disease for the 4 year period 1999–2002.

Methods: The design is a retrospective incidence survey. The patients reported in these two surveys are all new patients who were reported during the two study periods (1999–2000 and 2001–2002), although the data were collected retrospectively. A questionnaire was sent to all pediatric departments of hospitals with 100 beds or more throughout Japan, requesting data on patients with Kawasaki disease, such as sex, age, date of first hospital visit, recurrence, and cardiac lesions.

Results: The total number of patients reported in the 4 year period 1999–2002 was 32 266 (18 604 male, 13 662 female), with an average annual incidence of 137.7 per 100 000 children younger than 5 years old. The male/female ratio was 1.30. The incidence peaked at 9–11 months of age, and the proportion of patients under 1 year of age was 26%. The monthly distribution had a high peak in January and a gradual increase in summer. Geographically, the high-incidence areas were limited to certain prefectures and moved from year to year. The cardiac lesions at acute stage and cardiac sequelae occurred more in children under 1 year and older than 4 years. Among the principal symptoms, fever persisting ≥5 days occurred most commonly, followed by conjunctival congestion, changes in lips and oral cavity, polymorphous exanthema, and changes of extremities. Cervical lymphadenopathy occurred less.

Conclusion: More than 32 000 patients with Kawasaki disease during the 4 year period 1999–2002 were reported to the nationwide incidence surveys. The number of patients is steadily increasing despite the decrease of children. The seasonal variation, geographical distribution, and age-specific distribution support the infection theory for the etiology of Kawasaki disease.