Singaporean nurses' provision of guidance to parents on non-pharmacological postoperative pain-relief methods: An educational intervention study

Authors


Hong-Gu He, Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Level 2, Clinical Research Centre, Block MD11, 10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597. Email: nurhhg@nus.edu.sg

Abstract

This study examined the impact of an educational intervention (booklet distribution and lectures) on Singaporean nurses' provision of guidance to parents on the use of non-pharmacological methods of pain relief for their child's postoperative pain. Using a quasi-experimental one-group pre- and post-test study design, 134 and 112 registered nurses completed the questionnaires pre- and post-test, respectively. More than 75% of the nurses “always” guided parents to use breathing techniques, relaxation, positioning, comforting/reassurance, helping with activities of daily living, and creating a comfortable environment in the pretest and touch, presence, and distraction in addition to the aforementioned methods in the post-test. The nurses' provision of guidance to parents on all non-pharmacological methods increased, but statistically significant increases only were found in relation to massage and positive reinforcement. The results suggested that the educational intervention had some impact on nurses' provision of guidance to parents on the use of non-pharmacological methods of pain relief for children's postoperative pain. Continuing education in pain management should be provided to nurses in order to equip them with the knowledge to improve their practice.

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