Survey of Australian practitioners' provision of healthy lifestyle advice to clients who are obese

Authors

  • Samantha Ashby MApp.Sci, BSc(Hons), DipCOT, PGCert Teaching and Learning,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Health
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Carole James MHsc(OT), BSc(OT), DipCOT, PhD,

    1. Faculty of Health
    2. Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ronald Plotnikoff BA, MEduStudies, PhD,

    1. Faculty of Education & Arts
    2. Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Clare Collins BSc; PG Dip Nutrition & Dietetics; PG Dip Clinical Epidemiology; PhD,

    1. Faculty of Health
    2. Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Maya Guest BOHS, BMedSci(Hons), PGCert Teaching and Learning,

    1. Faculty of Health
    2. Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ashley Kable RN, Dip Teach Nursing Education, Grad Dip Health Service Management, PhD,

    1. Faculty of Health
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Suzanne Snodgrass BSc, ATC, MMedSs(Physio), PhD

    1. Faculty of Health
    2. Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Samantha Ashby, Faculty of Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Hunter Building, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Email: samantha.ashby@newcastle.edu.au

Abstract

Obesity is a global issue, with healthcare practitioners increasingly involved in clinical interactions with people who are overweight or obese. These interactions are opportunities to provide evidence-based healthy lifestyle advice, and impact on public health. This study used a cross-sectional survey of Australian healthcare practitioners to investigate what influenced the provision of healthy lifestyle advice to obese and overweight clients. A modified theory of planned behavior was used to explore knowledge translation processes. Knowledge translation was linked to three factors: (i) a healthcare practitioner's education and confidence in the currency of their knowledge; (ii) personal characteristics – whether they accepted that providing this advice was within their domain of practice; and (iii) the existence of organizational support structures, such as access to education, and best practice guidelines. To fulfill the potential role healthcare practitioners can play in the provision of evidence-based health promotion advice requires organizations to provide access to practice guidelines and to instill a belief in their workforce that this is a shared professional domain.

Ancillary