IL-16 polymorphism and risk of renal cell carcinoma: Association in a Chinese population

Authors

  • Jian Zhu,

    1. Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, and
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    • These authors equally contributed to the work.

  • Chao Qin,

    1. Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, and
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    • These authors equally contributed to the work.

  • Fu Yan,

    1. Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Cancer Center of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Meilin Wang,

    1. Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Cancer Center of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Qi Ding,

    1. Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, and
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  • Zhengdong Zhang,

    1. Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Cancer Center of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Changjun Yin

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, and
      Changjun Yin md phd, Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029, China. Email: drcjyin@gmail.com
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Changjun Yin md phd, Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029, China. Email: drcjyin@gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives:  Interleukin-16 (IL-16) plays a fundamental role in inflammatory diseases, as well as in the development and progression of tumors. A T-to-C polymorphism at the -295 position in the promoter region of the IL-16 gene has been described. This variation might lead to altered IL-16 expression, and might modulate an individual's susceptibility to cancer. The objective of the present study was to determine if IL-16 polymorphism is associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

Methods:  A case–control study including 335 RCC cases and 340 cancer-free controls was carried out. All subjects were genetically unrelated ethnic Han Chinese recruited from a single institution between July 2006 and July 2009. The IL-16 -295 T>C polymorphism was determined by using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Serum samples were available for 70 RCC cases and 96 controls to detect IL-16 concentration.

Results:  Compared with the IL-16 -295 TT genotype, the CC genotype had a significantly decreased RCC risk (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.18–0.66). Furthermore, a significant decreased risk of RCC was found in the combined variant genotypes CT + CC compared with the TT genotype (adjusted OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.50–0.93). In addition, the serum IL-16 levels in RCC patients were significantly lower than those in controls (P < 0.001). Furthermore, patients carrying CC genotype or CT genotype had higher serum IL-16 levels than TT carriers.

Conclusion: IL-16 -295 T>C polymorphism is significantly associated with a higher risk of developing RCC in Chinese population.

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