Conservation planning in a cross-cultural context: the Wunambal Gaambera Healthy Country Project in the Kimberley, Western Australia

Authors

  • Heather Moorcroft,

  • Emma Ignjic,

  • Stuart Cowell,

  • John Goonack,

  • Sylvester Mangolomara,

  • Janet Oobagooma,

  • Regina Karadada,

  • Dianna Williams,

  • Neil Waina


Heather Moorcroft is a conservation planner and PhD candidate at the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research (University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia; Tel: 0401 414 732; Email: hmoorcroft@bigpond.com). Emma Ignjic is an Indigenous Partnerships Officer with Bush Heritage Australia (PO Box 329, Flinders Lane, Melbourne, Victoria 8009, Australia; Email: eignjic@bushheritage.org.au). Stuart Cowell is Conservation Programs Manager with the Tasmanian Land Conservancy and was previously with Bush Heritage Australia (PO Box 2112, Lower Sandy Bay, Tasmania 7005; Email: cowellsg@gmail.com). John Goonack is a Wunambal man, a Wunambal Gaambera Traditional Owner and Wunambal Gaambera Aboriginal Corporation (WGAC) Director; Regina Karadada is a Gaambera elder, a Wunambal Gaambera Traditional Owner and WGAC Director; Sylvester Mangolomara is a Wunambal man, a Wunambal Gaambera Traditional Owner and Wunambal Gaambera Senior Cultural Advisor; Janet Oobagooma is a Wunambal elder and Wunambal Gaambera Traditional Owner; Neil Waina is a Gaambera man, a Wunambal Gaambera Traditional Owner and Head Uunguu Ranger; Dianna Williams is a Gaambera elder, a Wunambal Gaambera Traditional Owner and WGAC Cultural Advisor Director, [PMB 16 (Kalumburu) via Wyndham, Western Australia, 6740, Australia]. This article is a narrative of aspects of a conservation planning process. It is based on the views of the authors who were involved in the process. Traditional Owners have approved the article and the use of the images.

Abstract

This article illustrates how a conservation planning approach combined Indigenous knowledge and Western science to support Indigenous Traditional Owners to make decisions about managing their ancestral lands and seas, and communicate more strategically with external stakeholders

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