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Translocation of the Eastern Bristlebird 2: applying principles to two case studies

Authors

  • Jack Baker,

    1. Jack Baker, David Bain, Jean ClarkeandKris Frenchare members of the Institute for Conservation Biology and Environmental Management (University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia; Tel: +61 2 4221 3655; Email:jbaker@uow.edu.au). This work was an integral part of the NSW Recovery Plan for the Eastern Bristlebird. The Jervis Bay project was part of David Bain’s PhD, and the Illawarra project was a culmination of two decades of successful recovery actions for the species.
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  • David Bain,

    1. Jack Baker, David Bain, Jean ClarkeandKris Frenchare members of the Institute for Conservation Biology and Environmental Management (University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia; Tel: +61 2 4221 3655; Email:jbaker@uow.edu.au). This work was an integral part of the NSW Recovery Plan for the Eastern Bristlebird. The Jervis Bay project was part of David Bain’s PhD, and the Illawarra project was a culmination of two decades of successful recovery actions for the species.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jean Clarke,

    1. Jack Baker, David Bain, Jean ClarkeandKris Frenchare members of the Institute for Conservation Biology and Environmental Management (University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia; Tel: +61 2 4221 3655; Email:jbaker@uow.edu.au). This work was an integral part of the NSW Recovery Plan for the Eastern Bristlebird. The Jervis Bay project was part of David Bain’s PhD, and the Illawarra project was a culmination of two decades of successful recovery actions for the species.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kris French

    1. Jack Baker, David Bain, Jean ClarkeandKris Frenchare members of the Institute for Conservation Biology and Environmental Management (University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia; Tel: +61 2 4221 3655; Email:jbaker@uow.edu.au). This work was an integral part of the NSW Recovery Plan for the Eastern Bristlebird. The Jervis Bay project was part of David Bain’s PhD, and the Illawarra project was a culmination of two decades of successful recovery actions for the species.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Summary  The Eastern Bristlebird (Dasyornis brachypterus) is an endangered endemic passerine of south-eastern Australia. The re-establishment of extirpated populations through translocation was identified as a key action in New South Wales to address the threats to this species associated with habitat fragmentation and widespread and frequent fire. At Jervis Bay during 2003–2005, 50 birds were translocated from Bherwerre Peninsula to Beecroft Peninsula. In the Illawarra in 2008, 50 birds were translocated from Barren Grounds Nature Reserve to Cataract. At Jervis Bay, monitoring indicated that after 7 years, (i) there was no detectable impact on the source population from the removal of birds and (ii) the count at Beecroft Peninsula was 94 birds, with dispersal up to 6.3 km from the release point. In the Illawarra, (i) the source population was recovering 3 years post-removal and (ii) the maximum count at Cataract was 15 birds after 3.5 years, including evidence of breeding, and after 3 years, the maximum dispersal was 7 km from the release point. Both translocations adhered to five key principles as follows. (i) Feasibility analysis prior to each project was favourable. (ii) For 17 pre-stated criteria for success, 14 and 10, respectively, were met for Jervis Bay and Illawarra. (iii) Financial accountability was achieved with detailed statements showing budgets of $201k and $92k, respectively, for Jervis Bay and Illawarra. (iv) Ecological research was incorporated into both projects. (v) The results of each project are progressively being published. The re-introduction at Jervis Bay has succeeded, and we are optimistic about the Illawarra re-introduction.

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