Get access

Successful treatment of surgically induced necrotizing scleritis with tacrolimus

Clinical Case Notes

Authors

  • Alvin L Young MMedSc FRCS,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales and Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospitals
    Search for more papers by this author
  • SM Wong MRCP,

    1. Department of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Alfred TS Leung FRCS,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales and Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospitals
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gloria YS Leung MRCSEd,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales and Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospitals
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lulu L Cheng FCOphthHK,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales and Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospitals
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dennis SC Lam MD FRCOphth

    1. Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales and Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospitals
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A 46-year-old man developed surgically induced necrotizing scleritis (SINS) 7 months following uneventful primary bare sclera pterygium excision. The patient underwent two scleral patch grafts for SINS but despite the use of cyclophos­phamide and azathioprine, the scleral patch grafts failed within 1 month of surgery on both occasions. Tacrolimus was used for his third scleral patch graft. No recurrence of necrotizing scleritis was observed for 2 years. Tacrolimus may be considered as a valuable adjunctive immuno­suppressant in the management of resistant necrotizing scleritis.

Ancillary