Clinical and research applications of anterior segment optical coherence tomography – a review

Authors

  • Jose Luiz Branco Ramos MD,

    1. Center for Ophthalmic Optics and Lasers, Doheny Eye Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA
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  • Yan Li PhD,

    1. Center for Ophthalmic Optics and Lasers, Doheny Eye Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA
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  • David Huang MD PhD

    1. Center for Ophthalmic Optics and Lasers, Doheny Eye Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA
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  • Proprietary interests: David Huang receives royalty from a patent on optical coherence tomography licensed to Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. Yan Li, and David Huang receive grant support from Optovue, Inc; David Huang also received stock options and travel support from Optovue.

Dr David Huang, Doheny Eye Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, 1450 San Pablo Street, DEI 5702, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
Email: dhuang@usc.edu

Abstract

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is being employed more and more often to image pathologies and surgical anatomy within the anterior segment, specifically in anterior chamber biometry, corneal pachymetric mapping, angle evaluation and high-resolution cross-sectional imaging. The cross-sectional imaging capability of OCT is similar to ultrasound, but its higher resolution allows OCT to measure and visualize very fine anatomic structures. No contact is required. In this review, we describe the utility and limitations of anterior segment OCT.

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