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J Donald M Gass MD: father of macular diseases, and one of the ten most influential ophthalmologists of the 20th century

Authors

  • Suresh K Pandey MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Suvi Eye Institute and Research Centre, Kota, Rajasthan, India
    2. Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    3. John A. Moran Eye Centre, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
      Dr Suresh K Pandey, Suvi Eye Institute and Research Centre, C13 Talwandi, Kota, Rajasthan 324005, India. Email: suresh.pandey@gmail.com
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  • Vidushi Sharma MD FRCSEd,

    1. Suvi Eye Institute and Research Centre, Kota, Rajasthan, India
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  • Denis M O'Day MBBS FACS FRACP,

    1. Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt, Nashville, Tennessee, USA
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  • Frank A Billson FRANZCO

    1. Suvi Eye Institute and Research Centre, Kota, Rajasthan, India
    2. Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Conflict/competing interest: None declared.

Dr Suresh K Pandey, Suvi Eye Institute and Research Centre, C13 Talwandi, Kota, Rajasthan 324005, India. Email: suresh.pandey@gmail.com

Abstract

John Donald MacIntyre Gass, MD was one of the most significant figures to emerge in ophthalmology in the last 100 years. There could be few ophthalmologists who cannot attribute part of their increase in understanding of retinal disease to the influence of Don Gass. His insights opened up opportunities for many new effective therapies. He has influenced ophthalmic thought worldwide, if not by his presence as a visitor, then through his scientific publications, his outstanding books and the international fellows he trained. Like many distinguished physicians, Don Gass's clinical acumen was well grounded in his understanding of ocular pathology. This experience was gained under the mentorship of Lorenz E Zimmerman, MD, who trained a number of distinguished ophthalmologists, who subsequently became professors. Professor Gass passed away on February 26, 2005 at the age of 76 years from pancreatic carcinoma. With the demise of Don Gass, the world of ophthalmology has lost an extraordinary physician of great talent, commonsense and humility. On the other hand it has gained a generation of young ophthalmologists inspired by his example.

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