Prevalence of signs and symptoms of ocular surface disease in individuals treated and not treated with glaucoma medication

Authors

  • Sudipta Ghosh MNAMS,

    1. Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    2. Rotary Narayana Netralaya, Department of Ophthalmology, Salt Lake, Kolkata
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    • Authors contributed equally to the manuscript and share first authorship.

  • Fleur O'Hare MPhil,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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    • Authors contributed equally to the manuscript and share first authorship.

  • Ecosse Lamoureux PhD,

    1. Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Rasik B Vajpayee FRANZCO,

    1. Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    2. All Indian Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
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  • Jonathan G Crowston FRANZCO PhD

    1. Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Competing/conflicts of interest: No stated conflict of interest.

  • Funding sources: The Centre for Eye Research Australia receives Operational Infrastructure Support from the Victorian Government.

Ms Fleur O'Hare, Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Department of Ophthalmology, East Melbourne, Vic. 3002, Australia. Email: oharef@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Background:  To determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of ocular surface disease in two hospital-based cohorts; glaucoma patients and non-glaucoma patients.

Design:  A cross-sectional, comparative case series.

Participants:  Glaucoma patients (n = 300) prescribed topical glaucoma medications for ≥6 months were compared with control patients (n = 100) who were not applying prescribed topical medications.

Methods:  A validated self-report questionnaire was used to elicit the extent of ocular symptoms. Signs of ocular surface and eyelid disease were assessed along with medication history.

Main Outcome Measures:  Signs and symptoms of ocular surface pathology were determined including the tear film break-up time, fluorescein staining of the cornea and conjunctiva, meibomian gland dysfunction and Schirmer's test.

Results:  A significant increase in the prevalence of ocular surface disease signs was observed in the glaucoma population, 70.3%, compared with controls, 33% (P < 0.001). The overall prevalence of clinically significant ocular surface disease symptoms was not significantly different between cohorts, 30.7% versus 24.0%, respectively (P = 0.252). Logistic regression analysis showed that the number of anti-glaucoma medications and duration of therapy were key predictors of significant ocular surface disease signs in the glaucoma group. There was no significant correlation between signs and symptoms of ocular surface disease in either group after adjusting for age and gender.

Conclusions:  Signs and symptoms of ocular surface disease are relatively common in older patients, but signs of ocular surface disease are significantly higher in individuals who instil topical glaucoma therapy.

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