Familial retinal detachment associated with COL2A1 exon 2 and FZD4 mutations

Authors

  • Thomas L Edwards MBBS PhD,

    1. Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Department of Ophthalmology
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  • Benjamin O Burt FRANZCO,

    1. Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA
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  • Graeme CM Black FRCOphth DPhil,

    1. Genetic Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre (MAHSC), School of Biomedicine, University of Manchester
    2. Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester
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  • Rahat Perveen BSc MSc,

    1. Genetic Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre (MAHSC), School of Biomedicine, University of Manchester
    2. Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester
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  • Lisa S Kearns BOrth,

    1. Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Department of Ophthalmology
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  • Sandra E Staffieri BAppSci(Orth),

    1. Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Department of Ophthalmology
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  • Carmel Toomes PhD,

    1. Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
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  • Robert G Buttery PhD FRANZCO,

    1. Vitreo-retinal Unit, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria
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  • David A Mackey MD FRANZCO

    Corresponding author
    1. Lions Eye Institute, Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
      Professor David A Mackey, Lions Eye Institute, Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 2 Verdun Street, Nedlands 6009, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Email: dmackey@utas.edu.au
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  • Competing/conflicts of interest: No stated conflict of interest.

  • Funding sources: Centre for Eye Research Australia (CERA) receives Operational Infrastructure Support from the Victorian Government. We are grateful of the support provided by Peggy and Leslie Cranbourne Foundation. DAM is a recipient of the Pfizer Australia Senior Research Fellowship.

Professor David A Mackey, Lions Eye Institute, Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 2 Verdun Street, Nedlands 6009, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Email: dmackey@utas.edu.au

Abstract

Background:  To characterize the clinical and genetic abnormalities within two Australian pedigrees with high incidences of retinal detachment and visual disability.

Design:  Prospective review of two extended Australian pedigrees with high rates of retinal detachment.

Participants:  Twenty-two family members from two extended Australian pedigrees with high rates of retinal detachment were examined.

Methods:  A full ophthalmic history and examination were performed, and DNA was analysed by linkage analysis and mutation screening.

Main Outcome Measures:  Characterization of a causative hereditary gene mutation in each family.

Results:  All affected family members of one pedigree carried a C192A COL2A1 exon 2 mutation. None of the affected family members had early-onset arthritis, hearing abnormalities, abnormal clefting or facial features characteristic of classical Stickler syndrome. All affected members of the familial exudative vitreoretinopathy pedigree carried a 957delG FZD4 mutation.

Conclusions:  Patients with retinal detachment and a positive family history should be investigated for heritable conditions associated with retinal detachment such as Stickler syndrome and familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. The absence of non-ocular features of Stickler syndrome should raise the possibility of mutations in exon 2 of COL2A1. Similarly, late-onset familial exudative vitreoretinopathy may appear more like a rhegmatogenous detachment and not be correctly diagnosed. When a causative gene mutation is identified, cascade genetic screening of the family will facilitate genetic counselling and screening of high-risk relatives, allowing targeted management of the pre-detachment changes in affected patients.

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