Screening for colorectal cancer by faecal occult blood test: why people choose to refuse

Authors

  • D. L. Worthley,

    Corresponding author
    1. 1 Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia and 2Bowel Health Service, Repatriation General Hospital and 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia and 4Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    • Daniel L. Worthley, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Flinders Medical Centre, Room 3D230, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia. Email: dan@worthley.name

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  • 1,2 S. R. Cole,

    1. 1 Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia and 2Bowel Health Service, Repatriation General Hospital and 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia and 4Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • 1 A. Esterman,

    1. 1 Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia and 2Bowel Health Service, Repatriation General Hospital and 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia and 4Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • 3 S. Mehaffey,

    1. 1 Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia and 2Bowel Health Service, Repatriation General Hospital and 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia and 4Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • 1 N. M. Roosa,

    1. 1 Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia and 2Bowel Health Service, Repatriation General Hospital and 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia and 4Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • 4 A. Smith,

    1. 1 Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia and 2Bowel Health Service, Repatriation General Hospital and 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia and 4Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • 2 D. Turnbull,

    1. 1 Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia and 2Bowel Health Service, Repatriation General Hospital and 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia and 4Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • and 4 G. P. Young 1,2

    1. 1 Department of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia and 2Bowel Health Service, Repatriation General Hospital and 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia and 4Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • Funding: This study was funded by a NH&MRC project grant.

    Potential conflicts of interest: Professor Young reports having received research funds and consulting fees from Enterix.

Abstract

To better understand the personal barriers that limit participation in faecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening for colorectal cancer, non-participants from a recent screening initiative were sent detailed questionnaires, defining their reasons for not participating, as well as how to make screening more attractive. The important barrier was procrastination. The type of FOBT kit offered influenced the reasons for not participating. Convenient FOBT and greater general practitioner involvement may be important for optimizing community acceptance of FOBT-based screening.

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