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Coronary heart disease is associated with regional grey matter volume loss: implications for cognitive function and behaviour

Authors

  • O. P. Almeida,

    1. 1 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia and Departments of 4Psychiatry, 5Geriatric Medicine, 6Cardiology, 7Nuclear Medicine and 8Medical Engineering and Physics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • 1,2,4 G. J. Garrido,

    1. 1 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia and Departments of 4Psychiatry, 5Geriatric Medicine, 6Cardiology, 7Nuclear Medicine and 8Medical Engineering and Physics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • 1 C. Beer,

    1. 1 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia and Departments of 4Psychiatry, 5Geriatric Medicine, 6Cardiology, 7Nuclear Medicine and 8Medical Engineering and Physics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • 1,3,5 N. T. Lautenschlager,

    1. 1 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia and Departments of 4Psychiatry, 5Geriatric Medicine, 6Cardiology, 7Nuclear Medicine and 8Medical Engineering and Physics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • 1,2,4 L. Arnolda,

    1. 1 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia and Departments of 4Psychiatry, 5Geriatric Medicine, 6Cardiology, 7Nuclear Medicine and 8Medical Engineering and Physics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • 3,6 N. P. Lenzo,

    1. 1 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia and Departments of 4Psychiatry, 5Geriatric Medicine, 6Cardiology, 7Nuclear Medicine and 8Medical Engineering and Physics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • 7 A. Campbell,

    1. 1 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia and Departments of 4Psychiatry, 5Geriatric Medicine, 6Cardiology, 7Nuclear Medicine and 8Medical Engineering and Physics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • and 8 L. Flicker 1,3,5

    Corresponding author
    1. 1 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia and Departments of 4Psychiatry, 5Geriatric Medicine, 6Cardiology, 7Nuclear Medicine and 8Medical Engineering and Physics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    • Leon Flicker, Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing (M573), University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.
      Email: leon.flicker@uwa.edu.au.

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  • Funding: This study was funded by a project grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (project number: 403996). The funding agency had no role in the design, analysis or drafting of the results of this study. Griselda J. Garrido is partly supported by the Fundação de Amparo à pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP project grant 03/11794-6).

    Potential conflicts of interest: None

Abstract

Coronary heart disease (CHD) has been associated with impaired cognition, but the mechanisms underlying these changes remain unclear. We designed this study to determine whether adults with CHD show regional brain losses of grey matter volume relative to controls. We used statistical parametric mapping (SPM5) to determine regional changes in grey matter volume of T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of 11 adults with prior history of myocardial infarction relative to seven healthy controls. All analyses were adjusted for total grey and white matter volume, age, sex and handedness. CHD participants showed a loss of grey matter volume in the left medial frontal lobe (including the cingulate), precentral and postcentral cortex, right temporal lobe and left middle temporal gyrus, and left precuneus and posterior cingulate. CHD is associated with loss of grey matter in various brain regions, including some that play a significant role in cognitive function and behaviour. The underlying causes of these regional brain changes remain to be determined.

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