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Perceptions and attitudes of rehabilitation medicine physicians on complementary and alternative medicine in Australia

Authors

  • J. C. S. Mak,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of 1Endocrinology and Metabolism and 2Aged Care and Rehabilitation, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, University of Sydney, and 3Department of Aged Care and Rehabilitation, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales and 4Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • 1,2,3 L. Y. H. Mak,

    1. Departments of 1Endocrinology and Metabolism and 2Aged Care and Rehabilitation, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, University of Sydney, and 3Department of Aged Care and Rehabilitation, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales and 4Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • 3 Q. Shen,

    1. Departments of 1Endocrinology and Metabolism and 2Aged Care and Rehabilitation, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, University of Sydney, and 3Department of Aged Care and Rehabilitation, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales and 4Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • and 3 S. Faux 4

    1. Departments of 1Endocrinology and Metabolism and 2Aged Care and Rehabilitation, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, University of Sydney, and 3Department of Aged Care and Rehabilitation, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales and 4Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • This work was presented as an oral paper at the 15th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine (Sydney, Australia), 22–25 May 2007 and as part of an oral paper at the 4th World Congress of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM), Seoul, Korea, 10–14 June 2007.

    Funding: None

    Potential conflicts of interest: None

Jenson C. S. Mak, Department of Aged care and Rehabilitation, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, NSW 2200, Australia.
Email: jenson.mak@gmail.com

Abstract

Background:  The growing demand for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is undeniable. We report a first study about the attitudes and behaviour of Australian rehabilitation physicians to CAM.

Methods:  A prospective cross-sectional survey was undertaken to document the prevalence of, knowledge about and referrals to CAM therapies and their perceived effectiveness, by a sample of Australian rehabilitation physicians.

Results:  Thirty-six out of 94 actively practising rehabilitation physicians from the Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, replied to the survey, a response rate of 38%, and 85% reported familiarity with CAM, the most familiar therapies being acupuncture (80%), yoga (74%) and Tai-Chi (72%). CAM referral was reported in 84%, 38% personally used CAM, 94% of patients enquired about CAM therapies, 32% of respondents routinely enquired about CAM use. Age, sex and year of Fellowship were not associated with familiarity, personal use or frequency of patient enquiry about CAM. Those who reported to be very familiar with CAM were more likely to routinely enquire about CAM use (= 0.028) and be more confident in prescribing certain CAM therapies (< 0.05).

Conclusion:  Australian rehabilitation physicians report similar CAM referral rates to Canadian physiatrists and Australian general practitioners. The most commonly prescribed therapies were acupuncture, yoga and Tai-Chi. Almost all patients use CAM therapies, but only a minority of rehabilitation physicians enquires about CAM use on a regular basis. The latter may avoid potentially harmful drug interactions, as well as improve the quality of the physician–patient relationship.

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