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Keywords:

  • monocyte chemoattractant protein-1;
  • silent cerebral infarction;
  • haemodialysis

Abstract

Background:  In patients with chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis (HD), silent cerebral infarctions (SCI) are associated with high mortality. Levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) increase with renal dysfunction and may be a novel predictor for cerebrovascular events. We tested the hypothesis that increased MCP-1 concentration correlate with the occurrence of SCI in HD patients.

Methods:  Using cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, 52 Japanese patients undergoing HD were divided into two groups: with SCI (61 ± 7 years, mean ± SD, n= 28) and without SCI (60 ± 6 years, n= 24). The gender, metabolic profiles and MCP-1 concentration were compared between the two groups.

Results:  The level of MCP-1 was higher in the with-SCI group than in the without-SCI group (P < 0.0001). The proportion of smokers was higher in the with-SCI group (P < 0.05) than in the without-SCI group. Plasma level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was lower, while uric acid level was higher, in the with-SCI group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.05 respectively) compared to the without-SCI group. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified MCP-1 level as being significantly associated with the presence of SCI (odds ratio 1.48, 95% confidence interval = 1.10–5.75, P < 0.0001).

Conclusions:  This study indicates that patients with chronic renal failure who are maintained on HD exhibit an increased prevalence of SCI, and that MCP-1 is significantly associated with the presence of SCI in HD patients.