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Citation analysis of mental health nursing journals: How should we rank thee?

Authors

  • Glenn E. Hunt,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Sydney, and Research Unit, Concord Centre for Mental Health, Concord Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales
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  • Brenda Happell,

    1. Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Engaged Research Chair, Mental Health Nursing, CQUniversity Australia, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
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  • Sally W.-C. Chan,

    1. Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Clinical Research Centre, Singapore
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  • Michelle Cleary

    1. Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Clinical Research Centre, Singapore
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  • Glenn E. Hunt, PhD.

  • Brenda Happell, RN, PhD.

  • Sally Wai-chi Chan, RN, PhD.

  • Michelle Cleary RN, PhD.

Glenn E. Hunt, Discipline of Psychiatry, University of Sydney, and Research Unit, Concord Centre for Mental Health, Concord Hospital, Concord, NSW 2139, Australia. Email: glenn.hunt@sydney.edu.au

ABSTRACT

The journal impact factor (JIF), and how best to rate the performance of a journal and the articles they contain, are areas of great debate. The aim of this paper was to assess various ranking methods of journal quality for mental health nursing journals, and to list the top 10 articles that have received the most number of citations to date. Seven mental health nursing journals were chosen for the analysis of citations they received in 2010, as well as their current impact factors from two sources, and other data for ranking purposes. There was very little difference in the top four mental health nursing journals and their overall rankings when combining various bibliometric indicators. That said, the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing is currently the highest ranked mental health nursing journal based on JIF, but publishes fewer articles per year compared to other journals. Overall, very few articles received 50 or more citations. This study shows that researchers need to consider more than one ranking method when deciding where to send or publish their research.

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