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Relationship between dual-task performance and neurocognitive measures in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Authors

  • Hyuma Makizako,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, Center for Gerontology and Social Science
    2. Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan
      Dr Hyuma Makizako PhD, Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 35 Gengo, Morioka-machi, Obu, Aichi 474-8511, Japan. Email: makizako@ncgg.go.jp
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  • Takehiko Doi,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, Center for Gerontology and Social Science
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  • Hiroyuki Shimada,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, Center for Gerontology and Social Science
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  • Daisuke Yoshida,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, Center for Gerontology and Social Science
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  • Yuko Takayama,

    1. Department of Speech Therapy, Ukai Rehabilitation Hospital, Aichi
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  • Takao Suzuki

    1. National Institute of Longevity Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology
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Dr Hyuma Makizako PhD, Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 35 Gengo, Morioka-machi, Obu, Aichi 474-8511, Japan. Email: makizako@ncgg.go.jp

Abstract

Aim:  The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between dual-task performance and neurocognitive measures in community-dwelling older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

Methods:  A total of 98 subjects (mean age 74.8 years, 52.0% female) participated in the study. We compared 36 participants with amnestic MCI (aMCI) with 62 participants with non-amnestic MCI (non-aMCI) on dual-task performance as measured by reaction time responses. The relationships between dual-task performance and multiple domains of neurocognitive functions, including general cognitive function, visual memory, working memory, executive function and processing speed, were examined.

Results:  Although there were no statistically significant group differences in simple reaction times (P = 0.734), the aMCI group showed significantly slower dual-task reaction times than the non-aMCI group (P = 0.012). Using multiple regression analysis, we found that there was a significant relationship between executive function and dual-task reaction times (β = 0.298, P = 0.006).

Conclusion:  These results showed that aMCI subjects showed a specific deficit in dual-task performance compared with non-aMCI subjects, and poor dual-task performance was associated with declines in executive function in older people with MCI. Future longitudinal and interventional studies should investigate the use of dual-task testing with varying levels of cognitive demand in older adults at risk of dementia. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2013; 13: 314–321.

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