Rare multiple combined anomaly of the vertebral vessels and bronchial artery

Authors

  • Toyoko Kawate,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan
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  • Haruo Futamata,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan
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  • Yoshikazu Kitami,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan
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  • Sen Takeda

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan
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Sen Takeda, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimo-Kateau, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi, 409-3898, Japan. Email: stakeda@yamanashi.ac.jp

Abstract

Reported herein is a rare case of multiple vascular anomalies involving the vertebral vessels and the bronchial artery. In the present case the vertebral artery, which normally originates from the subclavian artery, arose directly from the cranial side of the aortic arch, just between the left common carotid and subclavian artery. Furthermore, the bilateral entry of the vertebral artery deviated to the upper level of the transverse foramen of the cervical vertebrae (C5). In addition, the left vertebral vein went through the transverse canal via the 5th and 7th transverse foramen, and drained into the left venous angle. Another conspicuous variation observed in this cadaver was the bronchial artery stemming from the left subclavian artery. This phenotype is an additional branch of bronchial arteries, which in normal cases arises from the descending aorta. These two anomalies could be explained by the deviation of the anlage for the left subclavian artery. The present report should be of interest for the clinician with regard to vascular anomalies in the neck and thoracic region, and may give insight into elucidating the developmental mechanism of angiogenesis.

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