Reality of the G-spot and its relation to female circumcision and vaginal surgery

Authors


Dr Saeed M. A. Thabet, 19 Maamal AI-Alban St, El-Khalafawi, Shoubra, Cairo, Egypt. Email: dr_saeedth@hotmail.com

Abstract

Aim:  To clarify the reality of the G-spot anatomically, functionally and histologically, and to determine the possible effect of female circumcision and anterior vaginal wall surgery on the integrity and function of the G-spot.

Methods:  A controlled descriptive and comparative cohort prospective study was conducted at Kasr El Aini School of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt, of 50 uncircumcised and 125 circumcised women with small to moderate anterior vaginal wall descent. Preoperative sexual examination was performed to map the site of the G-spot and other anatomical landmarks on the anterior vaginal wa11 and to verify the associated circumcision state. Pre- and postoperative sexual assessment and histological examination of different mapped sites in the anterior vagina were also conducted.

Results:  Histological findings, results of the anatomical and sexual mapping of the anterior vaginal wall and sexual scores were recorded. The G-spot was proved functionally in 144 (82.3%) of women and anatomically in 95 (65.9%). The latter appeared as two small flaccid balloon-like masses on either side of the lower third of the urethra and were named ‘the sexual bodies of the G-spot’. These bodies were significantly detected in all histo-positive cases in the circumcised women and in the uncircumcised women who had small or average clitorises. The G-spot was also proved histologically in 47.4% of all cases and was formed of epithelial, glandular and erectile tissue. Sex scores were significantly higher in the histo-positive cases with sexual bodies but significantly dropped after anterior vaginal wall surgery. In contrast, female circumcision rarely alters the scores.

Conclusion:  The G-spot is functional reality in 82.3% of women, an anatomical reality in 54.3% and a histological reality in 47.4%. Anterior vaginal wall surgery usually affects the G-spot and female sexuality, but female circumcision rarely affects them.

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