• brain metastasis;
  • cervical cancer;
  • lung metastasis;
  • small cell carcinoma


Aim:  The purpose of this study was to describe the features of patients with brain metastasis from cervical cancer.

Material and Methods:  The medical records of patients with cervical cancer between February 2001 and June 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical characteristics, symptoms, treatment and survival in patients with brain metastasis were analyzed.

Results:  Eleven patients with brain metastasis from cervical cancer were identified, representing an incidence of brain metastasis in the study population of 0.45%. Median patient age at initial diagnosis of cervical cancer was 50 years (range 33–75 years). Non-squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed in six (54.5%) of the 11 patients, with small cell carcinoma diagnosed in two patients. Ten of the 11 patients had lung-related metastasis at presentation; eight patients had lung metastasis, one had mediastinal lymph node metastasis, and one had pleural metastasis. The median interval from diagnosis of cervical cancer to identification of brain metastasis was 15.4 months (range 3.4–83.3 months). Nine patients presented with neurologic symptoms, such as headache, nausea, vomiting, seizure and extremity weakness. Initially, six patients received whole brain radiotherapy: three patients received chemotherapy; one underwent surgery; and one patient refused treatment. The median survival time after diagnosis of the brain metastases was 5.9 months (range 0.7–19 months).

Conclusion:  The prognosis after diagnosis of the brain metastasis in patients with uterine cervical cancer is poor. The small cell type and lung metastasis seem to be related with brain metastasis and may be regarded as risk factors.