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Cholecystokinin in Mammalian Primary Sensory Neurons and Spinal Cord: In Situ Hybridization Studies in Rat and Monkey

Authors

  • V. M. K. Verge,

    1. Department of Histology and Neurobiology, Karolinska Institute, Box 60400 S-104 01 Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Clinical Physiology, Section of Neurophysiology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Z. Wiesenfeld-Hallin,

    1. Department of Histology and Neurobiology, Karolinska Institute, Box 60400 S-104 01 Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Clinical Physiology, Section of Neurophysiology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • T. Hökfelt

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Histology and Neurobiology, Karolinska Institute, Box 60400 S-104 01 Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Clinical Physiology, Section of Neurophysiology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
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Tomas Hökfelt, as above

Abstract

The peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) has been suggested to be involved in nociception, but its exact localization at the level of the spinal cord and in spinal ganglia has been a controversial issue. Therefore the distribution of messenger RNA (mRNA) for CCK was studied by in situ hybridization using oligonucleotide probes on sections of adult rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia following unilateral section of the sciatic nerve and on sections of untreated monkey trigeminal ganglia, spinal cord and spinal ganglia from all levels. For comparison, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA was also studied in the monkey tissue using the same techniques. Peripheral sectioning of the sciatic nerve in the rat resulted in the appearance of detectable CCK mRNA in up to 30% of remaining ipsilateral L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglion neurons 3 weeks after surgery, with a distinct but more limited appearance also in the contralateral ganglia. No cells, or only single cells, could be seen in normal control rat ganglia. In contrast, in the normal monkey, ∼20% of dorsal root ganglion neurons, regardless of spinal level, and 10% of trigeminal ganglia neurons expressed mRNA for CCK. CGRP mRNA was expressed at detectable levels in ∼80% of these monkey dorsal root ganglion neurons. In the monkey spinal cord, CCK mRNA was detected in the dorsal horn and in motoneurons, whereas CGRP mRNA was only seen in motoneurons. The present results suggest that CCK peptides can be involved in sensory processing in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in normal monkeys and in rats after peripheral nerve injury, adding one more possible excitatory peptide to the group of mediators in the dorsal horn.

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