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Keywords:

  • Key words: in situ hybridization;
  • optic nerve;
  • oligodendrocytes;
  • retina;
  • spinal cord;
  • type-2 astrocytes

Abstract

Janusin (formerly termed J1-160/180) is an oligodendrocyte-derived extracellular matrix molecule which is restricted to the central nervous system and which is expressed late during development (Pesheva et al., J. Cell Biol., 1765 – 1778, 1989). To gain insights into the molecule's morphogenetic functions and to identify its cellular source in vivo, we have studied the localization of janusin messenger RNA in the optic nerve, retina and spinal cord and the expression of janusin protein in the spinal cord of developing and adult mice. Moreover, we have analysed optic nerve cell cultures and retinal cell suspensions in double-labelling experiments using a janusin-specific anti-sense complementary RNA probe and cell type-specific antibodies to identify the cell types containing janusin transcripts. In developing animals, oligodendrocytes were strongly labelled with the janusin anti-sense cRNA probe during the period of myelination. The number of labelled cells and intensity of the hybridization signal decreased significantly with increasing age. Interestingly, expression of janusin was not confined to oligodendrocytes. Some neuronal cell types and type-2 astrocytes present in optic nerve cell cultures also contained janusin transcripts. In contrast to oligodendrocytes, the number and labelling intensity of neurons containing janusin transcripts remained constant during postnatal development and into adulthood. Expression of janusin protein in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated, with a peak of expression in 2-or 3-week-old animals. The molecule was visible in the white and grey matter. In myelinated regions, it was associated with myelinated fibres and accumulated at nodes of Ranvier. These observations suggest that janusin may be of functional relevance for myelination.