Changes in reelin expression in the mouse olfactory bulb after chemical lesion to the olfactory epithelium

Authors

  • Ayako Okuyama-Yamamoto,

    1. Division of Anatomy and Developmental Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650–0017, Japan
    2. Division of Health Sciences, Department of Physical Therapy, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654–0142, Japan
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  • Tatsuro Yamamoto,

    1. Division of Anatomy and Developmental Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650–0017, Japan
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  • Akinori Miki,

    1. Division of Health Sciences, Department of Physical Therapy, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654–0142, Japan
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  • Toshio Terashima

    1. Division of Anatomy and Developmental Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650–0017, Japan
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Dr T. Terashima, as above.
E-mail: ttera@med.kobe-u.ac.jp

Abstract

To explore the functional roles of Reelin in the adult olfactory system, we examined changes in the expression of reelin mRNA and Reelin protein in the olfactory bulb (OB) of adult mice after a chemical lesion to the olfactory epithelium. Following intranasal irrigation with 2% zinc sulphate solution, animals were perfused at various times between 5 and 40 days post-lesion. The expression of reelin mRNA in mitral cells in the OB was slightly reduced at 5 days post-lesion, completely abolished by 20 days, but restored almost to the normal level at 40 days post-lesion. Similarly, the expression of Reelin protein in mitral cells of the deafferented OB also recovered, although not to the normal level. No recovery of either reelin mRNA or Reelin immunoreactivity was seen in the periglomerular cells and external tufted cells. The expression profile of reelin mRNA and Reelin protein in the OB coincided with the time course of degeneration and regeneration of olfactory nerves, as indicated by anterograde labeling of olfactory nerves with WGA-HRP. These results suggest that expression of reelin mRNA in the adult OB is regulated by olfactory inputs.

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