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Induction of LTP in the human auditory cortex by sensory stimulation

Authors

  • W. C. Clapp,

    1. Psychology Department, and Research Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, City Campus, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • I. J. Kirk,

    1. Psychology Department, and Research Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, City Campus, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • J. P. Hamm,

    1. Psychology Department, and Research Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, City Campus, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • D. Shepherd,

    1. Psychology Department, and Research Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, City Campus, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • T. J. Teyler

    1. Medical Education Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, and Department of Veterinary & Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, & Physiology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA
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Dr W. C. Clapp, as above.
E-mail: w.clapp@auckland.ac.nz

Abstract

High-frequency, repetitive, auditory stimulation was used to determine whether induction of a long-lasting increase of the human auditory evoked potential (AEP) was possible. Recording non-invasively with electroencephalogram scalp electrodes, stable increases in amplitude were observed in the N1 component of the AEP, which is thought to reflect activity within auditory cortex (N1). The increase was maintained over an hour and was shown to be independent of alterations in the state of arousal. This is the first demonstration of the induction of long-lasting plastic changes in AEPs, and suggest that this represents the first direct demonstration of long-term potentiation in the auditory cortex of normal, intact humans.

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