Opposite actions of hypothalamic vasopressin on circadian corticosterone rhythm in nocturnal versus diurnal species

Authors

  • Andries Kalsbeek,

    1. Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Hypothalamic Integration Mechanisms, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Linda A.W. Verhagen,

    1. Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Hypothalamic Integration Mechanisms, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Université Louis Pasteur, Département de Neurobiologie des Rythmes, Institut de Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, UMR CNRS-ULP 7518, IFR 37, 5 rue Blaise Pascal, 7168 Strasbourg, France
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    • *

      Present address: Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

  • Ingrid Schalij,

    1. Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Hypothalamic Integration Mechanisms, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Université Louis Pasteur, Département de Neurobiologie des Rythmes, Institut de Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, UMR CNRS-ULP 7518, IFR 37, 5 rue Blaise Pascal, 7168 Strasbourg, France
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  • Ewout Foppen,

    1. Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Hypothalamic Integration Mechanisms, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Université Louis Pasteur, Département de Neurobiologie des Rythmes, Institut de Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, UMR CNRS-ULP 7518, IFR 37, 5 rue Blaise Pascal, 7168 Strasbourg, France
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  • Michel Saboureau,

    1. Université Louis Pasteur, Département de Neurobiologie des Rythmes, Institut de Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, UMR CNRS-ULP 7518, IFR 37, 5 rue Blaise Pascal, 7168 Strasbourg, France
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  • Béatrice Bothorel,

    1. Université Louis Pasteur, Département de Neurobiologie des Rythmes, Institut de Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, UMR CNRS-ULP 7518, IFR 37, 5 rue Blaise Pascal, 7168 Strasbourg, France
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  • Ruud M. Buijs,

    1. Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Hypothalamic Integration Mechanisms, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Instituto Investigaciones Biomedicas UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico
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  • Paul Pévet

    1. Université Louis Pasteur, Département de Neurobiologie des Rythmes, Institut de Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, UMR CNRS-ULP 7518, IFR 37, 5 rue Blaise Pascal, 7168 Strasbourg, France
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Dr A. Kalsbeek, as above.
E-mail: a.kalsbeek@nin.knaw.nl

Abstract

Relatively little is known about the function of the biological clock and its efferent pathways in diurnal species, despite the fact that its major transmitters and neuronal connections are also conserved in humans. The mammalian biological clock is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Several lines of evidence suggest that the activity cycle of the SCN itself is similar in nocturnal and diurnal mammals. Previously, we showed that, in the rat, vasopressin (VP) derived from the SCN has a strong inhibitory effect on the release of adrenal corticosterone and is an important component in the generation of a daily rhythm in plasma corticosterone concentrations. In the present study we investigated the role of VP in the control of the daily corticosterone rhythm in a diurnal rodent, i.e. Arvicanthis ansorgei. Contrary to our previous (rat) results, VP administered to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in A. ansorgei had a stimulatory effect on the release of corticosterone. Moreover, both the morning and evening rise in corticosterone were blocked by the administration of a VP receptor antagonist. These results show that with regard to the circadian control of the corticosterone rhythm in diurnal and nocturnal rodents, temporal information is carried along the same pathway from the SCN to its target areas, but the response of the target area may be quite different. We propose that the reversed response to VP is due to a change in the phenotype of the target neurons that are contacted by the SCN efferents, i.e. glutamatergic instead of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic.

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