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Cortical spreading depression modulates synaptic transmission of the rat lateral amygdala

Authors

  • Shahab Dehbandi,

    1. Institut für Physiologie I, Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Robert-Koch-Strasse 27a, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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  • Erwin-Josef Speckmann,

    1. Institut für Physiologie I, Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Robert-Koch-Strasse 27a, D-48149 Münster, Germany
    2. Institut für Experimentelle Epilepsieforschung, Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Hüfferstrasse 68, 48149 Münster, Germany
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  • Hans Christian Pape,

    1. Institut für Physiologie I, Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Robert-Koch-Strasse 27a, D-48149 Münster, Germany
    2. Institut für Experimentelle Epilepsieforschung, Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Hüfferstrasse 68, 48149 Münster, Germany
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  • Ali Gorji

    1. Institut für Physiologie I, Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Robert-Koch-Strasse 27a, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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Dr A. Gorji, as above.
E-mail: gorjial@uni-muenster.de

Abstract

Clinical and pathophysiological evidence connects migraine and the amygdala. Cortical spreading depression (CSD) plays a causative role in the generation of aura symptoms. However, the role of CSD in the pathophysiology of other symptoms of migraine needs to be investigated. An in vitro brain slice technique was used to investigate CSD effects on tetanus-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the lateral amygdala (LA) of the combined rat amygdala–hippocampus–cortex slices. More than 75% of CSD induced in temporal cortex propagated to LA. Induction of CSD in combined amygdala–hippocampus–cortex slices in which CSD propagated from neocortex to LA significantly augmented LTP in LA. LTP was inhibited when CSD travelled only in the neocortical tissues. Separation of the amygdala from the remaining neocortical part of the slice, in which CSD propagation was limited to the neocortex, increased LTP close to the control levels. Pharmacological manipulations of the slices, in which CSD reached LA, revealed the involvement of NMDA and AMPA glutamate subreceptors as well as dopamine D2 receptors in the enhancement of LTP in LA. However, neither blocking of GABA receptors nor activation of dopamine D1 receptors affected LTP in these slices. The results indicate the disturbances of LA synaptic transmission triggered by propagation of CSD. This perturbation of LA synaptic transmission induced by CSD may relate to some symptoms occurring during migraine attacks.

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