Roles of opioid receptor subtypes in mediating alcohol-seeking induced by discrete cues and context

Authors

  • Peter W. Marinelli,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Alcohol Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada
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  • Douglas Funk,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Alcohol Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada
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  • Stephen Harding,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Alcohol Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada
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  • Zhaoxia Li,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Alcohol Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada
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  • Walter Juzytsch,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Alcohol Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada
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  • A. D. Lê

    1. Department of Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Alcohol Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada
    2. Departments of Pharmacology and Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
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Dr P. W. Marinelli, as above.
E-mail: Peter_marinelli@camh.net

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of selective blockade of the delta (DOP) or mu (MOP) opioid receptors on alcohol-seeking induced by discrete cues and context. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to self-administer alcohol in an environment with distinct sensory properties. After extinction in a different context with separate sensory properties, rats were tested for context-induced renewal in the original context following treatment with the DOP receptor antagonist naltrindole (0–15 mg/kg, i.p.) or the MOP receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP) (0–3 μg/4 μL, i.c.v.). In Experiment 2, reinstatement was tested with the presentation of a discrete light + tone cue previously associated with alcohol delivery, following extinction without the cue. The effects of naltrindole (0–5 mg/kg, i.p.) or CTOP (0–3 μg/4 μL, i.c.v.) were assessed. For context-induced renewal, 7.5 mg/kg naltrindole reduced responding without affecting locomotor activity. Both doses of CTOP attenuated responding in the first 15 min of the renewal test session; however, total responses did not differ at the end of the session. For discrete-cue-induced reinstatement, 1 and 5 mg/kg naltrindole attenuated responding but CTOP had no effect. We conclude that whereas DOP receptors mediate alcohol-seeking induced by discrete cues and context, MOP receptors may play a modest role only in context-induced renewal. These findings point to a differential involvement of opioid receptor subtypes in the effects of different kinds of conditioned stimuli on alcohol-seeking and support a more prominent role for DOP receptors.

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