An integrated approach to design novel therapeutic interventions for demyelinating disorders

Authors

  • Oscar G. Vidaurre,

    1. Department of Neuroscience and Genetics and Genomics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, Box 1065, New York, NY 10029, USA
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  • Jia Liu,

    1. Department of Neuroscience and Genetics and Genomics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, Box 1065, New York, NY 10029, USA
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  • Jeffery Haines,

    1. Department of Neuroscience and Genetics and Genomics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, Box 1065, New York, NY 10029, USA
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  • Juan Sandoval,

    1. Cancer Epigenetics and Biology Program (PEBC), Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
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  • Richard Nowakowski,

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, FL, USA
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  • Patrizia Casaccia

    1. Department of Neuroscience and Genetics and Genomics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, Box 1065, New York, NY 10029, USA
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Dr P. Casaccia, as above.
E-mail: patrizia.casaccia@mssm.edu

Abstract

Therapeutic strategies are often based on two general principles: interference with the pathogenic process and repair of the damaged tissues. Recent studies, however, have suggested that several pathological conditions may result from the interplay between genetic susceptibility traits and environmental influences that, by modulating the epigenome, also affect disease onset and progression. Based on lessons from neural development, it is conceivable that new lines of preventive and possibly therapeutic intervention might be developed to modulate disease onset or decrease the severity of the symptoms. This review will discuss these concepts within the context of multiple sclerosis, the most common demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, and the leading cause of progressive neurological disability in young adults.

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