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GABA transporter subtype 1 and GABA transporter subtype 3 modulate glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors in the rat globus pallidus

Authors

  • Xiao-Tao Jin,

    1. Division of Neuroscience, Yerkes National Primate Research Center
      Department of Neurology, UDALL Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease, Emory University, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
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  • Jean-Francois Paré,

    1. Division of Neuroscience, Yerkes National Primate Research Center
      Department of Neurology, UDALL Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease, Emory University, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
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  • Yoland Smith

    1. Division of Neuroscience, Yerkes National Primate Research Center
      Department of Neurology, UDALL Center of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease, Emory University, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
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Yoland Smith, as above.
E-mail: ysmit01@emory.edu

Abstract

The intra-pallidal application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter subtype 1 (GAT-1) or GABA transporter subtype 3 (GAT-3) transporter blockers [1-(4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (SKF 89976A) or 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP 5114)] reduces the activity of pallidal neurons in monkey. This effect could be mediated through the activation of presynaptic GABAB heteroreceptors in glutamatergic terminals by GABA spillover following GABA transporter (GAT) blockade. To test this hypothesis, we applied the whole-cell recording technique to study the effects of SKF 89976A and SNAP 5114 on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in the presence of gabazine, a GABAA receptor antagonist, in rat globus pallidus slice preparations. Under the condition of postsynaptic GABAB receptor blockade by the intra-cellular application of N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)-triethylammonium bromide (OX314), bath application of SKF 89976A (10 μm) or SNAP 5114 (10 μm) decreased the amplitude of eEPSCs, without a significant effect on its holding current and whole cell input resistance. The inhibitory effect of GAT blockade on eEPSCs was blocked by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABAB receptor antagonist. The paired-pulse ratio of eEPSCs was increased, whereas the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was reduced in the presence of either GAT blocker, demonstrating a presynaptic effect. These results suggest that synaptically released GABA can inhibit glutamatergic transmission through the activation of presynaptic GABAB heteroreceptors following GAT-1 or GAT-3 blockade. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that presynaptic GABAB heteroreceptors in putative glutamatergic subthalamic afferents to the globus pallidus are sensitive to increases in extracellular GABA induced by GAT inactivation, thereby suggesting that GAT blockade represents a potential mechanism by which overactive subthalamopallidal activity may be reduced in parkinsonism.

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